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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
the hurricane. >> i think that's a great question. the fact that the impact of the superstorm sandy was minimal, i think the biggest issue was the fact we did see people leave the workforce this month. i don't think you would have seen quite that drop in numbers if superstorm sandy hadn't happen. i think we actually would have seen unemployment rate closer to 7.9%. >> what about the new report that shows home prices jumping the fastest in seven years. what does it tell you about long-term health of the housing market. >> we've been hearing economists trumping returning housing market is the bright spot. this is a report from core logic showing home prices up -- have done the biggest year over year jump in six years. we're seeing the biggest jumps in nevada, california, arizona. actually oil states like the dakotas. overall about 45 out of 50 states have shown increases in home prices. i think this is really good news. i think americans should also remember that real estate and recovering real estate is very local. so we're seeing most of the growth in large cities. >> what about this gift from
, the impact from superstorm sandy. it wasn't there. that's what the bureau of labor sta stisks told us. we thought it might have a significant impact. it didn't. second of all, a number of people gave up on looking for work. that's why you see the significant decline in the unemployment rate. >> where were the jobs gained? >> primarily retail, which added 53,000 jobs. business services have been strong throughout this recovery. we saw those add 43,000 jobs and lastly health care, which has been one of those fields that most people would say is untouchable because there's a growing need for health care as the boomer population ages and because there are consistently jobs in the health care. also computer services were strong. retail, one thing to note, it's november, people hire for the holidays. >> rebecca jarvis, thank you. >> now to the crisis in the middle east. rejecting president mohamed morsi's call for reconciliation, refusing to compromise last night as he spoke to the nation. earlier, morsi got a call from president obama after a deadly confrontation between morsi's supporters and
hiring for the holidays offset the superstorm sandy. in addition, i think -- and where i would differ from jared just a little bit and we rarely do -- the underlying economy is consideri considerably stronger. if you take into account the number of baby boomers that are retiring, that has not been talked about and does effect the labor force participation rate. the broadest measure of unemployment, the unemployed and those who left the workforce fell to 14.7%. so i think things are getting better. what i'm most afraid of is the type of talk we heard from speaker boehner and maxine waters. they are taking us to the cliff on both sides. the fact that entitlements is off the table is crazy. my friend david kotac said we should go all go to our window as was done in the movie "network" and yell out the window and say, i'm mad as hell. quit messing around with the economy. >> jared, what do you think? >> listen, if john is correct that the economy is even doing a little better than we think, all the more reason -- it kind of underscores my basic point, which is all the more reason not to b
. chris christie met with president obama to talk about aid following superstorm sandy. and the first family lights up their tree. now let's get you back to "hardball." >>> just to be clear, i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevents the top rate from going up for folks at the top 2%, but i do remain optimistic that we can get something done that is good for families like this one and that is good for the american economy. >> welcome back to "hardball." today president obama took his fiscal pitch outside the beltway visiting a middle class family in the virginia suburbs. the president's message is resonating with people across america. a new quinnipiac poll proves it. 53% trust president obama and the democrats more to handle the fiscal cliff negotiations. only 36% trust the "r"s in congress. joining me is nbc chief white house correspondent and political director and host of "the daily rundown," anything else you control around here? >> that's enough. >> and "the washington post's" chris cillizza. i think you've been reupped. you're all over the place. you're the greates
not only because of the election, maybe firms sitting on their hands but superstorm sandy. still, guys, the number much better than expected. few tuesday, which were down right before the numbers hit, turned around. they are now higher fractionally so a big turn for stock futures and better than expected jobs number for november. i can dig in more once i get to the website. but those are your headline numbers. better than expected. >> gillian, better than expected. a lot of people blamed hurricane sandy again but that's encouraging. >> i have two economists, a liberal, who both said it was going to be somewhere between 80,000 and 100,000 jobs -- say that go sandy was worth 80 -- negatively 80,000 to 100,000. you take 146,000 and this could have been a 200-plus number. >> it's interesting because it ties in with consumer data we've been seeing which actually, you know, is not great. it's not buoyant, but it's not bad. and you look at the fact what american households have been doing recently with debt and the degree of debt they've been repaying, sort of deleveraging. you add it togethe
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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